• The combination of fresh crunchy vegetables, sweet savoury sauce and creamy tofu cubes, pairs really well with the tender noodle. The preparation for these summer soba noodle bowls could not be easier (Image credits: Ian McEnroe).

  • The combination of fresh crunchy vegetables, sweet savoury sauce and creamy tofu cubes, pairs really well with the tender noodle. The preparation for these summer soba noodle bowls could not be easier (Image credits: Ian McEnroe).

A recipe for Summer Soba Noodle Bowls

Have these soba noodle bowls for lunch or a light summery dinner. The combination of fresh crunchy vegetables, sweet savoury sauce and creamy tofu cubes, pairs really well with the tender noodle.

Cooking time

Serves

Serves 4 - 6

what you’ll need

  • 3-6 soba noodle bundles
  • 2-4 green onions/chives – finely sliced
  • 2 carrots (shredded, julienne or grated)
  • 1 seedless cucumber (julienne or thinly sliced)
  • ½ avocado
  • 1/4-1/2 cup unshelled and cooked edamame beans (optional)
  • 1 block of extra firm Tofu, small cubes
  • 3 tbsp soy sauce
  • 3 tbsp seasoned rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil + one extra tablespoon for finishing
  • 2 tbsp of honey or agave nectar
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
  • 1 garlic clove grated
  • the juice and the zest of one small orange
  • Thai Basil to garnish
  • Black or gold sesame seeds
  • 1 Red chilli, thinly sliced
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Lusciously light noodles, that’s my description for this dish. Cold soba noodles are a popular summer dish in Japan. The Japanese people are very wise by eating like this; light, savoury, and vegetable based – it’s a good way to stay cool. The traditional way to serve them is without toppings; just the delicate flavor of the noodle with some dipping sauce on the side. You dip them as you go.

In this recipe for the soba noodle bowl, we’ve given the dish a little kick and added some fresh vegetables and tofu. We usually have this for lunch or a light summery dinner. The combination of fresh crunchy vegetables, sweet savory sauce and creamy tofu cubes, pairs really well with the tender noodle. The preparation could not be easier, and if we measure preparation time versus rewarding flavours it is a winner.

If you think this dish looks complicated, don’t worry, its easy to make. To save you some prep time I recommend you invest on a little kitchen gadget: get yourself a julienne peeler. It is one of my favourite tools. Its fun, easy to use, and easy to clean. You can use this peeler for any other vegetable or fruit. One of the best kitchen gadgets to have.

recipe-for-summer-soba-noodle-bowls-pepper-passport-3

1.

Start by making your sauce. Place all its ingredients in a bowl and whisk. Set aside 1/3 of the sauce and marinate the tofu. While the tofu is absorbing all the flavours, proceed to cut and prepare your vegetables and garnishes.

2.

Bring a large pot of water up to a boil. Unlike regular pasta, you do not need to salt the water. Once the water is boiling place the noodles and monitor constantly, using a pasta spoon to prevent the noodles sticking. Bring the water up to simmering. Do not let it boil. Follow the instructions on the package, taste, it should have some elasticity to it. Usually takes around 4-5 minutes because they cook through quickly . Keep an eye on them to avoid over cooking. When the noodles are ready drain them into a colander. Immediately return them to the pot and fill the pot with cold water. Leave the water running into the pot a bit until the noodles cool down. Gently with your hands rinse the noodles in threads until they feel less starchy. Drain them again into a colander and allow them to drain. You can transfer them to a bamboo mat, to remove the excess water.

3.

In a non-stick pan proceed to cook the marinated tofu until golden brown. A little scorching doesn’t hurt either.

4.

In a large bowl season the noodles with a tablespoon of sesame oil and add sesame seeds.

5.

Divide all noodles evenly into 2 or 4 bowls, garnish with the Juliane carrots, cucumbers, avocado, sautéed tofu, edamame, red chilli.

6.

Serve a small sauce bowl per person for extra dipping the noodles. Enjoy!

Be sure to visit Yes, more please for step by step imagery that accompanies this recipe. It’s a gorgeous endeavour by Ian and Mariana to communicate to their readers that their recipes are easy to follow, achievable and meet expectations.  

About this Pepper Passport Writer

Ian and Mariana McEnroe are the creators of ‘Yes, More Please!

Ian has a Fine Arts degree from The University of Texas where he studied painting and photography. He has been working in the photographic industry for 15 years as a sales consultant and teacher.
 
Mariana is an Architect who graduated from ITESO in Guadalajara, Mexico. She also holds a Culinary Arts degree from Arizona Western College and has been cooking since she could reach the kitchen counter. Mariana has worked and taught in the culinary world and also created specialty baked goods.
 
Ian and Mariana married in 2008 and in 2013 created ‘Yes, More Please’ after much encouragement from friends and a need to explore and share inspirational recipes. They currently work and reside in Austin, Texas. 

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